From 1993 Rev. Elijah L. Hill's Speaking Engagements surrounding Pentecostal History Topics

ppointed for a three year term with the State of Nebraska Humanities Council Speakers Bureau form 1993-1996 speaking on Mother Lizzie Robinson's Humanitarian global works.

Rev. Elijah Hill's proposal of a new topic for the State of Nebraska's Speakers Bureau

ABSTRACT:

The African American resident of Nebraska, Mother Lizzie Robinson, and her worldwide Humanitarian works. 

THE PERSON: Lizzie (Woods) Robinson was born a slave on April 5, 1860, in Phillips County Arkansas.  For over thirty one years she resided in Omaha, Nebraska, where she headquartered her International organization, for the betterment of humanity abroad.  She continued in this life long work until the day of her death, on December of 1945, where she is presently buried in Omaha.

HER WORK: Around the time of the Great Depression, when our nation struggled within it's own economy to remain stable. This woman born in slavery having over came great disadvantages, as a woman, a African American, from a social-economic stand point.  In 1911, she started out developing and organizing throughout the United States and overseas, several social economic programs whereby, the traditionally disenfranchised grass-roots people could support themselves economically.  There were three main programs that she organized, and then trained hundreds of women throughout the United States to be satellites of her programs. The three programs created were called, Sewing Circle, Sunshine Band, and Home and Foreign Mission. 

A case in point of one of these programs, the sewing circle included things like:  encouraging the art of needle work, which created a means to make clothing for children, and also to convert it into a in-home business to support families.  The Sunshine Band was centered around increasing child development skills in women.  She taught them on subjects like, home economics, health care, personal management, parenting skills, and family relationships.  These are only a small portion of her work as being a national and International helper of humanity. 

HER REPRESENTATION: Mother Lizzie Robinson represents several cultural historic themes centered with confines of her life story.  She represents the early socio-economic struggles of women, minorities, and religion.  Her life is one of the great examples of being disadvantaged, and dedicating most of your life, to the promoting of the human welfare of others. 


Re: Seymour Conference, Azusa Centennial
From:
Elijah Hill <hilsker@yahoo.com>
View Contact
To:David Daniels <DDANIELS@mccormick.edu>

Hello David, it was good speaking with you today. I accept the invitation to present during the day session on the topic that was forwarded to your email.  As per our telephone conversation today I would like to request if it is ok to sell my books after my session or at Seymour Rallies at West Angeles.  Check to see what the possibilities would be.  God Bless!
 
Pastor Elijah Hill
214-636-7668

David Daniels <DDANIELS@mccormick.edu> wrote:
Dr. David Daniels, co-chair
Dr. A. G. Miller, co-chair
William J. Seymour and the Politics of Pentecostal Historiography Conference
Seymour Institute
5 February 2006

Dear Elijah Hill, 

We would like to invite you to present a paper at the William J. Seymour and the Politics of Pentecostal Historiography Conference. The conference will held from Wednesday, April 25 to Friday, April 28, 2006 at West Angeles Cathedral Church of God in Christ, Bishop Charles E. Blake (Senior Pastor), 3600 Crenshaw Bl., Los Angeles, California. The conference is being called by the Seymour Institute for Advanced Christian Studies. Each day the conference will begin at 9:30 p.m. and conclude at 3:30 p.m. The conference is being held in conjunction with the Azusa Street Revival Centennial Celebrations, April 24-29.

Your paper will be coupled with another one to form a panel. As a panelist you will be allotted twenty minutes to present your paper. The Seymour Institute is in conversations with publishers in order to publish a select group of the conference papers. Please submit your paper to the conference co-chairs, Drs. David Daniels and A. G. Miller, by April 18, 2006 so that the editorial committee can review the papers as a whole.

The conference is being sponsored with limited funds. All speakers are asked to secure their own funding to cover their costs.

If you are able to accept our invitation to present a paper, please let us know as soon as possible so that we can finalize the program. The contact information is: Dr. A. G. Miller of Oberlin College (A.G.Miller@oberlin.edu), 440-775-8652; Dr. David Daniels of McCormick Theological Seminary (ddaniels@mccormick.edu), 773-947-6342.

Peace,

Dr. David Daniels, co-chair
Dr. A. G. Miller, co-chair
Rev. Elijah L. Hill. in April 2006 was invited to speak at West Angeles Church of God in Christ at the Bishop William Seymour Seminar he was listed on the above program.

April 25-28, 2006

Event During 100th Year Azusa Centennial The Bishop William J. Seymour Symposium, A Scholarly examination and critique of the life and ministry of Bishop William J. Seymour.  Held at West Angeles COGIC, Los Angeles, California

Rev. Elijah L. Hill invited to present on the topic of

Bishop C.H. Mason Contending for the Faith of William J. Seymour

Introduction

In the book of Jude Chapter 1 and verse three in the Holy write it holds within its canals a verse that refers to the essence of my dissertation today.  Notice now with in the body of this text it reads, "I write unto you of the common salvation." This verse refers to the common salvation meaning that no one person, group, people, or organization can isolate or possess "the Common salvation” as only for themselves.  Invariably it is not mine or yours, but it this faith that we a lewd to today is given by God to the overall human family as a gift.  Ironically, we can only share it for God truly made it as such would be common to man.  This will be my thesis within the confines of my dissertation that William J. Seymour & Bishop C.H. Mason shared a commonality and partnership of faith (If you will)  that was worth preserving that future generations like us would one day ponder. Therefore if something is of grave importance to you then as the latter verse says in Jude, "Ye (you using the modern day vernacular) should earnestly contend for the faith which was once delivered unto the saints." Therefore I will share with you three points that will constitute the structure of my dialogue, number one what faith of William Seymour did Bishop Mason contend for, number two, why did he contend for his faith, and three how did he contend for William J. Seymour's faith.

Body

Bishop Charles Harrison Mason lived from 1866 to 1961, and was the founder of the Church of God In Christ.  The legacy he left to history is that he became one of the most significant figures in the rise and spread of the modern day Pentecostal Movement.  He was born the son of ex-slaves September 8, 1866, on Prior Farm just outside of the Memphis, TN area. 

In and around the beginning of February in 1907 attends as one of many eyewitnesses the Azusa Street Revival in Los Angeles, California.   What he finds there under the ministry of William J. Seymour causes him for five weeks of his life to forget about all that he knew before to seek after something he did not possess the Baptism of the Holy Ghost with the evidence of seeking in tongues.   The Apostolic Faith Newspaper of Pastor Seymour's documents Mason's presence and testifies of his final desire from God being fulfilled receiving the Holy Ghost infilling at the revival, it states, “March 19th 1907, was a wonderful day the Mission on Azusa St.  Three ministers from TN received the endowment of power from on high and the glory of God filled the upper room."

Elder Elijah Hill in April 2006 shared his chapter on this above book he wrote, "The Azusa Street Revival, wrapped in swaddoling cloths lying in a manger

Elder Elijah Hill in April 2006 shared his chapter on this above book he wrote, "The Azusa Street Revival, wrapped in swaddoling cloths lying in a manger

In 2006 this above issue of the Whole Truth Dr. David Hall, Sr, asked Elder Elijah L. Hill to write a review on the Azusa Street Revival William Seymour Rally, since Elder Hill had attended the event and Dr. Hall was familar with his writing ability.

The influence and spiritual impact of William J. Seymour's sermonic style and theological doctrine of Pentecost inspired Mason for the duration of his life and ministry. From that moment on Mason would never be the same he had been translated from just his former holiness faith too becoming for the next fifty of his life a standard for Pentecostalism in America.   Bishop Mason wrote with his own words in and around the year of 1918 about how his face to face experience felt like to sit attentively under the teaching of Seymour,  he state,  "I also thank God for Elder Seymour who came and preached a wonderful sermon.  His words were sweet and powerful and it seems that I hear them now while writing."

Mason gives a personal eyewitness account of the wonderful sermons and teachings of Elder Seymour while being personally in attendance at the services of what we celebrate and commemorate today as Azusa Street Revival.  Therefore, is it not true that just as Mason was amazed by his ministry one hundred years ago, this same Azusa Centennial event taking place here today has caused generations to still be left standing here wondering once more.  Elder Mason describes his personal observations and ministerial critique of Elder Seymour's sermonic presentation and doxology that consisted of three main points of appeal after the conclusion of his sermons; he memorized and recollects Seymour's very words,

"All of those that want to be sanctified or baptized with the Holy Ghost, go to the upper room, and those that want to be healed go to the prayer room, and those that want to be justified, come to the alter."  

Bishop C.H. Mason having been a denominational leader and gospel preacher for over ten years was amazed at William Seymour's God given exegesis of the 2 Chapter of the book of Acts.  He had heard many a preaching styles, but never had a man spoke like this surrounding the gift of tongues as evidence, but that the believer should manifest it by demonstrating divine love for all nationalities.  To justify my point it records twelve years later William J. Seymour arrives in Memphis, Tennessee to attend Bishop C.H. Mason's 12th Annual Holy Convocation.  The secretary records the interaction between these two men, and Mason greets Seymour before all his overseers, pastors, and organizational leader.  To celebrate Seymour coming Mason recalls and recollects to Seymour some of his most noble phases and statements that were original only to Bishop Seymour, which demonstrated he had been a student of his oral style.  It states in December 1919, that and I quote, "Chief Apostle Mason made some very timely remarks by way of responding in the noble sayings of Elder Seymour."


Bishop Ithiel Clemmons, stated 1996,  that Douglas Nelson's went beyond these older studies by offering the first rigorously historical effort to understand William J. Seymour as a "theologian" who demanded that racial equality and love must accompany glossolalia if it was to serve as the sign of the outpouring of the Spirit as on the Day of Pentecost.

The bases of his theological doctrine was stated in the September 1906 issues of his newspaper, which says,

“We are not fighting men or churches, but seeking to displace dead forms and creeds and wild fanaticisms with living, practical Christianity."  Love, Faith, Unity are our watchwords, and victory through the Atoning blood" our battle cry." 

William J. Seymour believed that the works of the Holy Spirit involved more than just displaying tongues, but his theological belief was that breaking down cultural barriers between races was the real manifestation of God's true kingdom truth. 

This was the original doctrinal teaching of Seymour, and this is why he was the vessel of choice of God to introduce this to the whole world globally.

Bishop C.H. Mason was so profoundly impacted by this doctrine of divine love that after leaving Azusa his rejection by his life long friend would not allow himself to be contentious with his life long close friend C.P. Jones.

In the November 28, 1908 one year later, Bishop C.H. Mason writes the Apostolic Faith Publication sharing his testimony about his battle with C. P. Jones who expelled him because of his experience of being filled with the Holy Ghost at the Azusa Street Revival.  Here is some of his dialogue, which states,

"Praise the Lord.  The fight has been great.  I was put out, because I believed that God did baptize me with the Holy Ghost among you all.  Well, He did it and it just suits me.  Glory in the Lord.  Praise His name.  I sit under His shadow with great delight; His banner over me is love."

Bishop C.H. Mason found himself faced with his great test of this new found faith given to him through the Spirit within the vessel of William Seymour.  Leaving the Azusa Revival newly birth into this Baptism he was given a choice by his life long friend to forget about this new experience of be cut off from fellowship from the denomination he help build for the past decade.  Nevertheless, Mason found himself no sooner than he returned home to Memphis contending for the original doctrine of Pentecost revealed to while sitting at the services of the Azusa Street Revival.  Bishop C. H. Mason's mantle of truly defending Seymour's doctrine, by suffering one of the greatest losses a great ministry comrade and life long friend, in order to contend for the faith that was delivered to the saints at the Azusa Street Mission. 

Bishop Mason's belief in the principle of Devine love that Seymour taught encouraged him to look at C. P. Jones as his brother despite his rejection of himself. 

Pastor William Seymour had challenge Mason through his dynamic theological genius giving to him by God to cause Mason to demonstrate he had truly received the Baptist by not just being preoccupied with the gift and not the fruit of the Holy Spirit. 

Bishop C.H. Mason had to make up his mind early to either allow his child like experience to be ripped out of his heart, or to bear his bitter sweet cross at the same time.  Ironically, Mason's vision he had the second night of the service at the Azusa Street Revival had came to pass.  The second night of service at the Azusa Street Mission Bishop C.H. Mason saw a vision as God's presence filled the room.  He stated,

"I saw myself standing alone and had a dry roll of paper.  I had to chew it.  When I had gotten it all in my mouth trying to swallow it, looking up towards the heavens there appeared a man at my side.  I turned my eyes at once, then I awoke and the interpretation came.  God had me swallowing the whole book, and that if I did not turn my eyes to anyone but God and Him only, He would Baptist me." 

Bishop C.H. Mason had through his heaven vision asked God if he would give him the Holy Ghost Baptist he would eat the whole book.  As the prophet Ezekiel stated in the third Chapter and first verse, which states,

(1) Moreover he said unto me, Son of man, eat that thou findest; eat this roll, and go speak unto the house of Israel. (2) So I opened my mouth, and he caused me to eat that roll.

Mason's initial experience was sweet in his mouth by receiving this new experience and doctrine, but it soon became bitter in his belly.  Yet, he had made a vow before God to not take his eyes out of the Master, if he would bestow on him this great gift.

Mason left his Azusa experience but refused to be denied the opportunity to contend for the faith that was once delivered to the saints at the Azusa Street Mission.  Holding firm to the scripture in Jude 1:3, which states,

"Beloved, when I gave all diligence to write unto you of the common salvation, it was needful for me to write unto you, and exhort you that ye should earestly contend for the faith which was once delivered unto the saints," 

Mason's heart was not just to uphold the relevance of the importance of speaking in tongues as the initial evidence, but supporting divine love too redefines the religious and political ideologies of mainstream Christian.  That the Holy Spirit baptism was a means to an end to unite all of God's people on the earth as a color-blind and non-racial family in the earth, to bring God's spiritual family together as one before the coming of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. 

One of Mason's famous says from the scriptures that penetrated his denominational culture was found in Hebrews 12:14, it states, "Follow peace with all men, and holiness without no man shall see the Lord."

The emphasize from the older saints was that you had to live right in order or your testimony to have any real substance.  This included true holiness meant to peruse peace with all men, for instance, you in Mason's view could not profess the Holy Ghost and be at odds with your brother.

The bases of Pastor William J. Seymour's theological doctrine was stated by himself in the September 1906 issues of his newspaper, which says,

“We are not fighting men or churches, but seeking to displace dead forms and creeds and wild fanaticisms with living, practical Christianity."  Love, Faith, Unity are our watchwords, and victory through the Atoning blood" our battle cry." 

William J. Seymour's message was to transform his present society and prepare them for the coming Kingdom, and his soon coming King.   He did not believe that the rules of our government took precedence over the true government of heaven.

The government of heaven included in Seymour's theological platform viewed a non-existent color line on earth as it is in heaven.  He literally took God at his word that God's Kingdom was coming, and that His will being done on earth was to bring together the Body of Christ through the practice of true love for one another.

Basically, Seymour instituted with God's power behind him a vision that would literally transform America's Jim Crow society almost fifty years prior to the civil rights movement in America.  The late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., stated sixty years later,  "The most segregated time in American is on Sunday morning when we all go to our several houses of worship based upon our color."

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr's., goal was to achieve desegregation through non-violent protest fifty years later.  William J. Seymour experienced this utopia fifty years earlier.  The over shadowing power of God's Spirit filled all races into one baptism and caused an immediate supernatural character change from racism to loving your neighbor as yourself, which is the original intent of God's Holy Word.  This is the second greatest commandment in the New Testament.

The theological position of William Seymour was the missing bases for Christianity which was divorced of racial segregation, and embraced an interracial worship experience as God's spiritual civil rights activist.

The difference in the normal mainline denomination was that African Americans took their doctrine from their white counterparts.  William Seymour and his protégé Bishop C.H. Mason developed their doctrinal position of interracial worship from God's revelation of them by the Holy Scriptures alone. 

If Seymour would have been the typical African American preacher during Jim Crow in America, he would have solicited his white father in the gospel's theological stance (Charles Parham) that God supported segregation of worship.

Seymour ultimately rejected this and being a son of ex-slaves proclaimed a bold position that racism, sexism, and the like were wrong. The love of one another was necessary to bring the Body of Christ in alignment for her bridegroom and soon coming King.

This vision that Mason saw revealed to him how he would carry the Pentecostal doctrine of Seymour as a part of his message to the world through his Church of God in Christ organization he had started ten years earlier. 

Later this vision becomes true because Mason becomes one of the most influential leaders in the infancy stage of the Modern Day Pentecostal Movement.  To also confirm this point, almost twelve years later the tables would turn, and William J. Seymour would be visiting Bishop C.H. Mason at his world headquarters during his 12th Holy Convocation in Memphis, Tennessee in December of 1919. 

This event occurred three years before William Seymour died in March of 1922.  This special visit that he made was to acknowledge, and place his blessing upon the importance of the Church of God in Christ movement within the future of Modern Day Pentecost.

This paragraph was recorded by recording secretary in the assembly of hundred or more pastors and overseer throughout the United States that followed the ministry of Chief Apostle Bishop Charles Harrison Mason.  The minutes stated in December 10, 1919 Thursday morning three years before the death of Pastor Seymour, secretary writes in the minutes, 

"Elder W.J. Seymour of Chicago, who also was one of the founders of this great movement, came to us at this hour. How glad our hearts were made to meet him.  Order of business was suspended for a few minutes to greet him.  Elder Seymour then spoke of his long and wearisome trip and how glad he was to get here.  He said he looked upon the Church of God in Christ to be the greatest movement on earth.  Therefore he rejoiced to stand among the greatest people on earth.  He asked us to contend for the doctrine.

In my conclusion comments

Bishop C.H. Mason, took Seymour's non-racial theological platform of divine love, and broadens and institutionalized that prospective within the modern day Pentecostal Movement.  The impact of Bishop Mason's profound organizational genius during the infancy stage of Modern Day Pentecost became one of the most direct influence black churchmen upon Modern Day Christendom.

Here are some of the many ways that Mason's influence took interracial relationship to the next level with Pentecostalism in America. 

1. From 1909-14 Mason institutionalized interracial and nonracist interaction by allowing white Pentecostal to administratively carry his   and August Feick.

3. In 1916-1919 Mason conducted healing campaigns in city auditoriums for all white groups, therefore institutionalizing interracial worship at a time when segregation practices was the culture of American history.

4. In 1914, in Hot Springs, Arkansas Mason was invited to speak and attended the first Assembly of God convention, where he was looked to by white Pentecostals to invoke his blessing upon the start of their denomination.

5. In 1907, institutionalized interracial and nonracial interaction by appointing a white brother to a national position William B. Holt as his national recording secretary.

6. In 1918, Mason institutionalized interracial and nonracial interaction by submitting a pacifist and conscious objector stance with US Government, which cause thousands white and black Pentecostal to unify surrounding the draft laws surrounding WWI.

7. In 1918-1919, Mason institutionalized interracial and nonracial positioning that provoked the FBI and the United States government prosecutes Mason for treason against the United States government.

8. In 1911, Mason appointing a woman to a national position within his denomination, keeping with Seymour's visibility of women working along side the men in ministry.

Bishop C.H. Mason demonstrated the true essence of the first-century apostle's mantle, and was the greatest example of an Apostle in the twentieth-century Pentecostal movement that personally received the baptism of the Holy Spirit at the Azusa Street Mission in 1907.  His adamant desire to maintain the true essence of the Azusa Street Revival allowed the type of growth that led to his organization becoming one of the largest African American Pentecostal organizations in American history.

Church of God in Christ National Publishing House Requesting Rev. Elijah L. Hill as a writer on their Sunday School Curriculum June 6, 2006 by Dr. David Hall, CEO, Memphis, TN.

Re: Elijah's New Book Review For Whole Truth
From:
Elijah Hill <hilsker@yahoo.com>
View Contact
To:David Hall <dahcogic@yahoo.com>


; padding-left: 10px; padding-right: 10px; height: 15px; float: right; background-position: -527px 1px;"> 
ElijahhProfessional.doc (36K

Dr. Hall, as per our telephone conversation today it would be a pleasure serving with the publishing aspect as it relates to the Sunday School Curriculum.  Here is my resume for you to submit with your other applicatants.   Look forward to hearing from you soon.  God Bless!
 
Elder Elijah L. Hill
214-636-7668

David Hall <dahcogic@yahoo.com> wrote

--- Elijah Hill wrote:
 Hello David, here is the new book review submittee by Professor Israel that you can use for the Whole Truth Magazine. Contact me if you have any questions.

> Elder Elijah Hill

Elder Hill,


Would you consider writing a Sunday School curriculum?  I need a male writer and later an offer of some

titular authority will be coming as we make some
transitions.

Call me and lets talk
David Hall, CEO

WRITERS CONFERENCE 2006 ARTICLE AND PHOTO IN WHOLE TRUTH MAGAZINE WITH ELDER ELIJAH L. HILL IN ATTENDANCE IN MEMPHIS, TN.

Appeared in the Whole Truth October issue of 2006 it read:

Memphis, TN--The Church of God in Christ Publishing House hosted a conference for curriculum writers.  The conference was conducted by Mother Mae C. Winbush, editor of the Sunday School literature.  Mother Winbush has served along side her husband, General Board member, Bishop Roy L.H. Winbush for nearly forty years. 

Three new writers, Elder Elijah L. Hill, Sister Patricia Stanley, and sister Eula Knox were instructed by publishing house staffers, Sister Anita Brown, Sister Davina King, and Dr. David A. Hall, Sr.  The Elder Jack Whitehead attended and shared his focus for the youth materials. 

It was a time of intense training and development.  The Publishing House is advancing and producing new and expanded materials for the Church.  The new writers will be in training for a short period and will write original pieces for the literature as assigned. 



In December 2008, Elder Elijah L. Hill began to write these above topics for the Junior High Senior High YPWW as a paid staff writer working under Bishop James L. Whitehead, Jr., Elder Hill wrote all of the topic and the lessons for the Winter Quarter from December 2008 to February 2009. 

August 1, 2006 8:25pm
From:
Elijah Hill <hilsker@yahoo.com>
View Contact
To:David Hall <dahcogic@yahoo.com>
Cc:ehill135@sprintpcs.com

I will be sending you my reservations in the next couple of days.
 
Elder Hill

David Hall <dahcogic@yahoo.com> wrote:
Elder Hill,


Is September 12-13, 2006 good for your travel to
Memphis? Mrs. Winbush is planning to train writers
during this two day period. Email me with an answer. 
Get your flight and send me the cost. I will attempt
to have your reimbursement ready on your departure.


David Hal

Elder Elijah Hill invited by the COGIC Scholars President Raynard Smith to present at the International AIM Convention for the Church of God in Christ surrounding his new book, "Women Come Alive," the life story of Mother Lizzie Robinson

 
From:
Elijah Hill <hilsker@yahoo.com>
View Contact
To:Raynard Smith <rdsmith20@earthlink.net>

Bro. Smith, here is the abstract and I will be glad to present on Thursday.  God Bless. 
 
Elder Elijah Hill



Abstract on Mother Lizzie Robinson: Behind every great man, there is a great woman; this saying embodies the life story of Mother Lizzie Robinson. Women fall in the backdrop imagery of the greatest accomplishments of male leaders in the Christian and secular American experience. The achievement of great women in religion and the secular world that are mothers, sisters, and wives that uphold their men down through the annals of time, and who become the cementing foundation of their successes.

The rights of white women at the beginning of the 20th Century were not in existence, let alone the rights of a poor, female, African-American ex-slave. In the year of 1911, eleven years before women's Suffrage Rights, she built up an army of praying women nationally that changed the social, economic, and religious belief of urban and rural black America.

Mother Lizzie Robinson's national prayer and self-help movement in the beginning of the 20th Century Pentecostal Movement also played a pivotal role in how women experienced important leadership development.  This ex-slave rose above the circumstances of sexism, racism, and poverty to encourage others through all-night prayer meetings to look to God for their help. Many men and women in urban and rural America's lives were changed from being a negative influence in American cities and communities too becoming some of the most upstanding and important leaders as a result of Mother Lizzie Robinson's national prayer movement. She based her movement from the scripture in Jeremiah 9:17, which says, "Thus saith the Lord of hosts, Consider ye, and call for the mourning women, that they may come; and send for cunning women, that they may come."

Out of all of the notable black American women her story and theme is central to understanding the African-American social and cultural life and a critical chapter in the history of our society and
religion in America that has remained silent to long.  She stands out as one of the greatest organizer of
female human capitol among Christian women. In 1991 the United States Department of Interior's National Registry of Historic Places decided that the life and humanitarian accomplishments of Mother Lizzie Robinson was significant to the history of America's cultural fabric and social-economic development nationally.

Bishop Charles Harrison Mason one of the most important figures in the 20th Century Pentecostal
Movement appointed Mother Robinson in 1911, to organize and built out a network of praying women who
could work in every state in the United States. This was the first time in history in the Pentecostal
Movement and traditional denominations that a woman white or black held a national role within an
organized male dominated religion. 

There are several things in her life that historically stands out above most other notable great woman. 

1. She held a national leadership role under a denominational structure despite sexist issues in 20th
Century America.

2. She developed an army of praying women who were trained by her in self-help techniques through the
United States that became change agents in many people’s lives in America.

3. She influenced the global vision of one of the fastest growing African-American Protestant Churches
in America, the Churches of God in Christ.

4. Through her national travels she raised the money to remove the glass-ceiling for African-American women to become foreign missionaries in Trinidad, Cristobal, Canal Zone, Haiti, Costa Rica, British West Indies, Cape Palmas, Africa, Monrovia, Africa, Wisseka Station, Africa, Tubake Station, and Africa.

5. Mary McLeod Bethune, one of the greatest female social advocates in America's history kept close
alliances with Mother Robinson's national army of women through her association with Dr. Arenia Mallory.
Dr. Mallory helped Bethune to establish the National Council of Negro women in 1935, through this national network of women organized and established by Mother Robinson.   Dr. Mallory was one of the men tees of Mother Lizzie Robinson who became the personal spokesperson for Mary McLeod Bethune internationally. Dr. Mallory spoke at many international Women’s Conferences all over the world on Bethune’s behalf. Both Bethune and Mallory were contemporaries who were early pioneers and trial blazers as educators who ran Colleges in early 20th Century America.

6. She built this elaborate women’s' ministry that six years later after her death in 1945 has created a
National Women's Convention in 1951. This fifty-four year old convention is one of the first women's
conventions for African-American women, and travels from state to state annually with women conventioneers ranging from 25,000+ women in attendance. Mother Lillian Brooks-Coffey who continued on with her work after her death in 1945 started this convention. Mother Coffey achieved what had not been done with Mother Robinson's army she galvanized them into a convention of their own, which was a first for any denomination in American's history.

The importance of Religion in the African-American experience cannot be overstated. In their everyday
struggle with economic, political, and cultural oppression, women within and outside of churches historically draw on the traditions of spiritual and biblical images. Most women who rose to prominence as national leaders were at one time church women and teachers such as, Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954), Mary McLeod Bethune (1875-1955), Nannie Helen Burroughs (1879-1961), and Mother Lizzie Robinson (1860-1945). 

Mother Lizzie Robinson was born a slave on April 5, 1860, in Phillips County, Arkansas. She was born
during a historical transitional period, five years before the Civil War, and spent most of her childhood
during the Post-Civil War Era. At the early age of eight years old her mother sent her to school, and she
learned to read the Bible at the age of eight. Her mother Melvina Smith would bring invite other former
slaves over who could not read to listen to Lizzie read the Bible to them for the next eight years.
Lizzie's mother Melvina impressed upon Lizzie at an early age that education, reading, writing, and using
her skills she could impact the illiteracy of former slaves that was forced on them during slavery. In her
early life the occupational opportunities for women in America was very limited she made a living with one
child being a widow washing white residence cloths in washtubs. Since she was poor she was not able to afford to go to school, but a famous white Missionary named Joanna P. Moore was so impressed by her biblical teaching ability she petitioned the white Baptist Missionary Society to pay for Lizzie to attend the
Baptist Academy. She at forty-eight years old matriculated in College at the Baptist Academy in Dermott, Arkansas around 1908. 

She met Bishop Charles Harrison Mason at the Dermott Baptist Academy, and she accepted his testimony of his Pentecostal experience. She became apart of his organization, and he appointed her in 1911 to organized national all-night prayer and fasting, movements within his organization from 1911-1945 for thirty-four years. In her life she developed many programs within Mason's denomination that encourage entrepreneurship, increased child development skills in women, and family relationships. 

She moved to Omaha, Nebraska in 1916 where she headquartered her international women's movement,
where she was buried in 1945 at the Mt Hope Cemetery.  Mother Robinson represents several cultural and historic themes that are centered within the confines of her life story. She represents the early
socio-economic struggles of women, minorities, and religion. Her life is one of the great examples of
being disadvantaged, and yet dedicating most of your life, too the promoting of the human welfare of
others.

Raynard Smith <rdsmith20@earthlink.net> wrote:
Elder Hill,

I know that we spoke about it on the phone but I need to know whether you will be able to present on your book on Mother Robinson at the upcoming AIM convention. Should you accept you will be presenting on Thursday afternoon during the 2pm to 5pm session. Let me know either way. Thank you.

Elder Smith

2007 COGIC Historic Project, August 8, 2006
From:
Elijah Hill <hilsker@yahoo.com>
View Contact
To:Bishop George McKinney <bishopgeorgemckinney@ststephenscogic.org>

It was a blessing to be able to speak with you again Bishop McKinney.  As per our telephone conversation today, I am forwarding you this correspondence surrounding your and my discussion about the 2007 COGIC Historic Project that Dr. David Daniels will be coordinating.
 
This is to express my interest in participating in the formulation of the project in whatever way that you of Dr. Daniels wishes.  Look forward to hearing from you soon.  God bless!
 
Elder Elijah L. Hill
214-636-7668
Member of Saintville COGIC, Dallas, Texas
Bishop J.N. Haynes my Bishop

The 100th Annual Holy Convocation Church of God in Christ

The O.T. Jones, SR. Memorial Educational Institute Rev. Elijah L. Hill participated as a National Seminar speaker for 4 consecutive years at the National Church of God in Christ Convocation.

November 2006-2009 Held During the Church of God in Christ Holy Convocation, in Memphis, Tennessee

Elder Elijah L. Hill, speaks before the National convocation to introduce his class on the importance of Bishop Mason's history




Elder Elijah L. Hill speaking at the National Holy Convocation in Memphis, TN as a Seminar Speaker




Elder Elijah L. Hill speaking at the National Holy Convocation in Memphis, TN as a Seminar Speaker








Rev. Elijah Hill at the 100th Year Celebration of the Church of God in Christ Elder Elijah Hill presents his new book on the historic photo album of the women's movement of the Church of God in Christ the book Th 100 photos of female pioneers that were former leaders in the Church.



Bishop Mason came home contending for his new found faith of Pentecostalism and doctrine of love even though he was taken to court and rejected by his life long friend CP Jones.
  1. The conspiracy of CP Jones and other ministers to stop Bishop CH Mason from spreading Pentecostalism within the Holiness Church of God in Christ.
  2. The court battles and church property battles that were essentially theological and doctrinal disputes of Bishop CP Jones & Bishop CH Mason. 
  3. Bishop CH Mason pushed into position by this denominational dispute to start his own Pentecostal Church of God in Christ in America, in order to maintain his new black theology.
  4. In 1919 three years before Bishop William Seymour’s death he can to the Holy Convocation and prophesied that the Lord would use the Church of God in Christ to contend for his lost doctrine.
  1. In 1918, Bishop Mason institutionalized interracial and nonracial interaction by submitting a pacifist and conscious objector stance with US Government, which cause thousands white and black Pentecostal to unify surrounding the draft laws surrounding WWI.
  2. In 1918-1919, Bishop Mason institutionalized interracial and nonracial positioning that provoked the FBI and the United States government prosecutes Mason for treason against the United States government.
  3. The President of the United States Woodrow Wilson agrees to investigate Bishop Mason’s pacifist and interracialism through the FBI investigation started surrounding his ministry, after thousands of whites agreed with Bishop Mason’s position.
  4. America’s federal government arrested in Lexington, and tried for treason against the United States government in Paris, Texas now Bishop Mason’s views institutionalized in America’s judicial court system.
  5. From 1909-14 Bishop Mason institutionalized interracial and nonracist interaction by allowing white Pentecostal to administratively carry his ministerial licensing.
  6. In 1916-1919 Bishop Mason conducted healing campaigns in city auditoriums for all white groups, therefore institutionalizing interracial worship at a time when segregationist practices was the culture of American public.
  7. In 1907, institutionalized interracial and nonracial interaction by appointing a white brother to a national cabinet position William B. Holt as his national recording secretary.
  8. In 1914, in Hot Springs, Arkansas Bishop Mason was invited to speak and attended the first Assembly of God convention, where he was looked to by white Pentecostals to invoke his blessing upon the start of their denomination.
  9. In 1911, Bishop Mason appointing a women to a national position within his denomination, keeping with Seymour's visibility of women working along side the men in ministry.
  10. In the Whole Truth News paper in 1933 Bishop CH Mason ask for a boycott of the buses in Memphis, TN, since they were mistreating blacks twenty years before Dr. Martin Luther King’s great Civil Rights Movement in America.

Rev. Elijah L. Hill in November 2008 ran for the National Trustee Board for the Church of God in Christ Headquartered in Memphis, TN.  Here is his advertisement for the election stating his qualification for the position just click on this flyer or this link to see Youtube video of his campaign www.youtube.com/user/kinglionhill#p/u/45/P5earl1B8Fc

 

Rev. Elijah L. Hill reverse side of the advertisement of his political campaign for the Trustee Board Position.

Rev. Elijah Hill's books are listed that have been in print over the past 30 years. 


 

Rev. Elijah L.. Hill, the Whole Truth Magazine for the Churches of God in Christ article about him creating the first On-Line Museum for the Church of God in Christ the offer interaction electronically amongst members of the Church of God in Christ Worldwide he developed it in 2008.  The museum current can be located on the Worldwide web at www.cogicmuseum.org and he named the name after Bishop Charles Harrison Mason and Mother Lizzie Robinson Historical Museum you can click on the flyer above or click on this link to see the cogicmuseum.org live.

HERE IS THE OFFICIAL COGIC MUSEUM WEBSITE IT WAS THE FIRST ONLINE MUSEUM CREATED IN THE CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST ORGANIZATION JUST CLICK ON THIS PICTURE OF THE SITE BELOW IT WAS DEDICATED BY ELDER ELIJAH HILL AS THE CHARLES HARRISON MASON AND MOTHER LIZZIE ROBINSON MUSEUM MAY 2009.



Rev. Elijah Hill in 2009 created the online museum the National Museum of African American Religions dedicated to all black religions in America to focus on the electronic archiving of their history for future generations just click on the above picture of the front of the site to view the live site.  The United States Congress and Senate approved a bill for the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C. to build a museum on the Washington Mall to commemorate African American's history to the history of America Rev. Hill's reason for creating this On-line museum was to start a dialogue with scholars on a national bases to demonstrate the importance of religion to African American's history as Washington, D.C. identifies important topics of our history.

Rev. Elijah Hill in April 2010 develops a site to specifically focus on the electronic archiving of African American Religious history, and to demonstrate his progress by sharing his partnerships of locating the museum in the Chicago, Illinois area.  In 2010 Rev. Elijah Hill produces a documentary African American life in Chicago, Illinois and the history of The Federal site the Swift Mansion, and the importance of African American Religion to America.  The Late Presiding Bishop Louis Henry Ford was one of the first Chicagoan that implemented true historic preservation in Chicago by owning the oldest house in Chicago and preserving it, so Rev. Hill did a dedication of his life as a historian and preservationist in the Chicago area in his documentary you can view it by clicking on this above link.

Rev. Elijah Hill in April of 2011 structured a partnership fundraiser for the National Museum of African American Religions to have a debit card that supporters in Alabama, New Mexico, California, Texas, Colorado, Florida, and Arizona if 19 years of age can open a bank account with $25 to help fund the archiving of history electronically.  The image that you see is how the logo of our organization will look once you have opened your account and had five transactions then  our organization will be funded by private funds.  For more information call one of our Texas local branches 817-860-2061 speak with Nancy Brannan to enquirer about becoming a support of our mission.  Then after you have called Nancy to open up your account, then come back to this site and click on this above banner to download and select our credit card logo to be ordered by the bank electronically.


Rev. Elijah Hill in January 2010 came up with the Clergy Awards as a fundraiser for the National Museum of African American Religions to assist with gather support for the cause of  archiving Black Church History in America, and to develop a way to acknowledge the accomplishments and success of clergy in America. We had an over whelming response of 1000 people vote for nominees for the Clergy Awards electronically via our above site.  Just click on this above picture to find out more about this event.

Rev. Elijah Hill and his organization in 2010 the National Museum of African American Religions organizes a group called the National Ministerial Alliance or ministers that support the archiving and preservation of the Black Churches history.  The reason for this is because it is important to identify those ministers that are willing to collaborate and assist our organization with sharing the word about our mission to archive electronically and preserve African American Religious History. Just click on this link below to find out more about our ministers association for preserving Black Church History. 

Rev. Elijah Hill and his organization 2010 the National Museum of African America Religions developed the idea of the Grooming Fee Campaign to raise 40 Million Dollars to develop a private economic stimulus plan to assist the unemployed and undeserved of American by encouraging the youth of America to have a part in turning around our economic plight in America.  Just click on this link below to find out more on our site.

Rev. Elijah Hill in 2011 introduced this site to share his personal data surrounding his ministry vision and his biography, and sample sermons.  Just click on this link to view my about his detail ministry vision and accomplishments.

 

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